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Website Terms Every Business Owner Should Know

Get familiar with the most common website terms and communicate better with your design and creative team.

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Updated: 

May 27, 2022

If you're a business owner, then you know how important it is to have a website. A website is your business' face to the world, and it's what people will use to get to know who you are and what you do.

But building a website isn't easy—there are a lot of technical terms that come into play when designing and developing a website. They're essential for communicating with other people, and they can also help you understand what's going on with your website. So here’s a quick rundown of basic website terms every business owner should learn.

Website Terms Every Business Owner Should Know

We’re sure you know just how important it is for your business to have a website. But do you know the lingo? Here are some of the most common words that every businessman should know:

Domain Name

This is the name given to your website. This is usually your business name, but sometimes it can be something else.

Domain Host

This is the company that hosts your domain name. You’ll need to find a domain host who will sell it or lease it to you. This can be your website or a hosting site like GoDaddy or Wix.

Web Host

A web host is a company that lets your rent the space 24/7 to store your website and make it available to the public. They keep your site safe and secure and provide you with a domain name.

Frameworks

Frameworks are pre-built templates that allow you to create a website with specific features already included quickly.

Database

A database uses many tables with multiple fields to store information orderly. The database, which has grown as technology has advanced, allows you to store, access, and query data.

Plugin

In most cases, a plugin will be used to improve the functionality of your website. The plugin saves time by preventing your website developer from rewriting published code.

Prototype

A prototype is an early version of an app or website that gives developers a chance to test out and avoid flat design mistakes before developing anything final.

IP Address (Internet Protocol address)

A unique identifier used to locate a computer or other device connected to the internet.

URL (Uniform Resource Locator)

You type this address into your browser that brings you to a specific website.

Navigation

The navigation on a website is the tool you use to move from page to page. It can be a menu at the top of the page or links at the bottom of each page.

Wire-frame

A wireframe is a low-fidelity version of what a web page might look like before any actual content is added to it.

A/B Testing

Testing two versions of a webpage against each other to determine which one performs better.

Front-end development

Front-end development is the creation of a web page's visual design. It includes HTML, CSS and JavaScript. Front-end development is basically what you see on your website.

website design on a screen

HTML (Hypertext Markup Language)

It is the language that web browsers use to display information on a page. HTML is commonly used to write instructions for your web browser.

CSS (Cascading Style Sheets)

CSS is a technique for making your web design basics look appealing. They determine text size, style, color, and the animations and structure of your web pages.

Backend development

Backend development is the process of creating the code that powers web design basics. Backend development includes creating databases and making sure that all of your backend systems work together seamlessly.

PHP (Hypertext Preprocessor)

PHP is a programming language used to create dynamic web pages. It's the code that can communicate with your database and return data as HTML text.

Javascript (JS)

Javascript is a computer language that allows website developers to create interactive elements for their sites. It will tell your web design basics what to perform in response to a user action.

Wire-frame

It’s a visual representation of what goes where on each website page so that clients can understand what their final product will look like before designers create it.

Landing page

This is the home page of your website, often called “the front door” of your business. Landing pages attract visitors, so it needs to have a clear purpose and offer something valuable to the visitor.

Above the fold

All material that loads when you first visit a website before scrolling. Using this space to contain your most vital information provides website visitors with a positive first impression.

Below the fold

If the content above the fold is what you see before you scroll, then the content below the fold is what you see as you scroll.

Content management systems (CMS)

CMS allows you to edit your site's content without learning how to code or hiring someone who knows how to code.

Search engine optimization (SEO)

SEO makes sure that search engines like Google Analytics will list your site in their search results when people type in keywords related to your business or industry.

A man working on his laptop

Blog

A blog is a website that contains articles, stories, and other information about your business. It's a place where you can share news about your company and most other kinds of content.

Cookies

Cookies are small pieces of information that a website stores. Cookies recognize your email address, store your preferences, or track how visitors use a website.

Index

It is how fast your site loads. The quicker it loads, the better your ranking in Google Analytics will be and the more visitors you will have.

Mockups

Designers often create mockups and allow you to present your design work or product in unique ways.

User Experience (UX)

The way a user feels about using your website, whether it's easy to use and intuitive or not, is referred to as user experience (UX) in the business.

User Interface (UI)

The user interface, often known as the graphical user interface (GUI), is the visual representation of the interactive parts of a website or program. It could be the appearance of the buttons, the layout of the keyboard, or the formation of a form.

Information Architecture (IA)

Information architecture (IA) is the structure of information within a website. It's what makes it easy for users to navigate and find what they're looking for, no matter how many pages are on your site.

Website Analytics

Website analytics is a way of measuring how your website is performing. A tool like Google Analytics is a great way to keep track of how people are interacting with your website. Google Analytics is an easy-to-use free service that lets you see your site's performance.

Call to action (CTA)

CTA is a marketing term, but website designers frequently use it to elicit a response from the visitor, usually something like "click here" or "purchase now.”

Use the terms correctly.

There you have it!  It’s crucial to use the terms correctly so you can ensure your goals and ideas are achieved by your creative and design team.

The bottom line is that when you're running a business, you want to be sure your website provider has your back if something goes wrong from time to time. Don't let the legal jargon scare you off—just know that it's there, and make sure you use the terms correctly.

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